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Why aren't there any green mammals?
Is eating bogeys bad for you?
Do dolphins and whales get thirsty?
Why can't you tickle yourself?
Where do astronauts put their dirty underwear?

Children make excellent scientists - they're inquisitive, keen to learn and have open minds. And they especially love to learn about all the gross stuff and all the weird facts - this book is packed full of them.

In Why Do Boys Have Nipples?, kids will discover how to extract iron from breakfast cereal; that fish communicate by farting; how to turn fried eggs green; why tigers have stripes, not spots; and much, much more.

Behind each surprising question and answer or wacky experiment is a scientific explanation that will teach kids more about biology, chemistry and physics, and the world around them.

Why do boys have nipples? - New Scientist

9781529317497
£ £2.39
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Title
Why do boys have nipples? - and 73 other weird questions that only science can answer
Author
New Scientist
format
Paperback / softback
Publisher
John Murray
Language
English
UK Publication Date
20190808

Why aren't there any green mammals?
Is eating bogeys bad for you?
Do dolphins and whales get thirsty?
Why can't you tickle yourself?
Where do astronauts put their dirty underwear?

Children make excellent scientists - they're inquisitive, keen to learn and have open minds. And they especially love to learn about all the gross stuff and all the weird facts - this book is packed full of them.

In Why Do Boys Have Nipples?, kids will discover how to extract iron from breakfast cereal; that fish communicate by farting; how to turn fried eggs green; why tigers have stripes, not spots; and much, much more.

Behind each surprising question and answer or wacky experiment is a scientific explanation that will teach kids more about biology, chemistry and physics, and the world around them.

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Since 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over 5 million highly engaged readers around the world.

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Type
BOOK
Keyword Index
Science - Miscellanea - Juvenile literature.
Country of Publication
England
Number of Pages
244

FREE Delivery on all Orders!